A forward-looking perspective

 

Joseph Klibansky

For the occasion of this anniversary, we have partnered with a striking artist, Joseph Klibansky. With a unique art experiment he knows how to connect all our relationships in a symbolic way. Especially for us he made his largest painting ever. Discover more about this special art project. Watch the making-of film and zoom in on the life-size work of art.

ABN AMRO MeesPierson is celebrating its 300th anniversary this year. We’ve seen the world change and develop since 1720. The financial world has flourished to unprecedented levels. As a progressive and forward-thinking visionary private bank, we’ve always moved with our clients’ changing wishes and requirements over the centuries. And we’ll continue to do so going forward.

In our anniversary year, we’re as committed as ever to investing in the future for our shared benefit. That’s why we’ve formed a unique partnership with Trees For All, a foundation that plants trees for us, so that we can look forward to a more sustainable future. Each tree planted is gifted to our clients, to you. With you on our team, we have every confidence in the next 300 years.

Banking over three centuries

A 300-year history

MeesPierson as it is today dates back to 1993. In that year, ABN AMRO combined its merchant banking subsidiaries Bank Mees & Hope and Pierson, Heldring & Pierson into a new bank. Four years later, MeesPierson was sold to Fortis. When ABN AMRO and Fortis merged in 2010, MeesPierson returned to being a division of ABN AMRO; the two organisations’ private banking activities were combined in ABN AMRO MeesPierson. MeesPierson is the product of many mergers of sometimes centuries-old bank, each with their own unique history, starting with the ‘Mees’ arm.

1720 – R. Mees & Zoonen

MeesPierson’s oldest roots lie in the eighteenth century, when Gregorius Mees joined Cordelois, De Vrijer & Mees, a Rotterdam-based cashier firm, in 1720. His son Rudolf followed in his footsteps and changed the name of the firm to R. Mees & Zoonen in 1786, after his two sons had joined. In those days, the firm mainly focused on insurance and bill brokerage and the cashier business (managing third-party funds for a fee). At the time, banks didn’t issue loans or pay interest. Given that the firm’s legal form didn’t offer the financial scope that was required for further growth, the firm decided to merge with renowned Amsterdam-based bank Hope & Co. in 1966. Business continued to flourish over the centuries. It new name was Mees & Hope, Bankiers.

1762 – Hope & Co.

Hope & Co. was established in 1762 by the Scottish Hope family, who were well-known merchants. The firm was led by Henry Hope, the family’s most prominent member, from 1781 to 1811. It specialised in foreign loans. It famously funded the Louisiana Purchase by the newly founded United States from French Emperor Napoleon in 1803.

1969 – Nederlandse Overzee Bank

The last arm of Bank Mees & Hope’s family tree is that of Nederlandse Overzee Bank. Mees & Hope, Bankiers merged with this bank in 1969 to create Bank Mees & Hope, which specialised in the international trade in goods, securities trading and stock exchange transactions, and industrial loans.

In the Netherlands, Kingma’s Bank, which was founded in 1869, was acquired in 1971, while Bank Mees & Hope took an equity stake in Paris-based Banque de Neuflize, Schlumberger, Mallet in France. As growth ground to a halt due to the economic downturn in the early 1970s and the consolidation drive in the banking industry continued, Bank Mees & Hope decided to join forces with a robust partner. It found its match in Algemene Bank Nederland (ABN). Although Bank Mees & Hope became a wholly owned ABN subsidiary on 28 October 1975, it continued to operate under its own name until the merger with Pierson, Heldring & Pierson in 1993.

19th century – Pierson & Co. and Heldring & Pierson

The Pierson in MeesPierson stems from another direct predecessor of MeesPierson alongside Bank Mees & Hope: Pierson, Heldring & Pierson. This bank, too, was the product of a merger between even older banks and name givers.

Pierson, Heldring & Pierson’s areas of expertise had many overlaps with those of Bank Mees & Hope. Pierson, Heldring & Pierson mainly focused on the corporate sector, institutional investors and high-net-worth individuals.

In 1975, Pierson, Heldring & Pierson decided to join a general bank with a broader financial base, i.e. Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank (Amro). The firm, which had become a public limited company by that time, did stay fully independent under its new owner and continued to operate under its own name.

A forward-looking perspective

The fact that our bank has been around for 300 years is testament to its penchant for moving with the trends of the times, acting ahead of the market and plotting a visionary strategy that makes the difference. In short, it’s indicative of a forward-looking perspective. Our aim is to be there for our clients and support them with our expertise. We’re knowledgeable and socially engaged, we take a personalised approach and we have the qualities and mentality of a game changer. We’re in it for the long haul: we can’t wait for the next 300 years.

Banking over three centuries

A 300-year history

MeesPierson as it is today dates back to 1993. In that year, ABN AMRO combined its merchant banking subsidiaries Bank Mees & Hope and Pierson, Heldring & Pierson into a new bank. Four years later, MeesPierson was sold to Fortis. When ABN AMRO and Fortis merged in 2010, MeesPierson returned to being a division of ABN AMRO; the two organisations’ private banking activities were combined in ABN AMRO MeesPierson. MeesPierson is the product of many mergers of sometimes centuries-old bank, each with their own unique history, starting with the ‘Mees’ arm.

1720 – R. Mees & Zoonen

MeesPierson’s oldest roots lie in the eighteenth century, when Gregorius Mees joined Cordelois, De Vrijer & Mees, a Rotterdam-based cashier firm, in 1720. His son Rudolf followed in his footsteps and changed the name of the firm to R. Mees & Zoonen in 1786, after his two sons had joined. In those days, the firm mainly focused on insurance and bill brokerage and the cashier business (managing third-party funds for a fee). At the time, banks didn’t issue loans or pay interest. Given that the firm’s legal form didn’t offer the financial scope that was required for further growth, the firm decided to merge with renowned Amsterdam-based bank Hope & Co. in 1966. Business continued to flourish over the centuries. It new name was Mees & Hope, Bankiers.

1762 – Hope & Co.

Hope & Co. was established in 1762 by the Scottish Hope family, who were well-known merchants. The firm was led by Henry Hope, the family’s most prominent member, from 1781 to 1811. It specialised in foreign loans. It famously funded the Louisiana Purchase by the newly founded United States from French Emperor Napoleon in 1803.

1969 – Nederlandse Overzee Bank

The last arm of Bank Mees & Hope’s family tree is that of Nederlandse Overzee Bank. Mees & Hope, Bankiers merged with this bank in 1969 to create Bank Mees & Hope, which specialised in the international trade in goods, securities trading and stock exchange transactions, and industrial loans.

In the Netherlands, Kingma’s Bank, which was founded in 1869, was acquired in 1971, while Bank Mees & Hope took an equity stake in Paris-based Banque de Neuflize, Schlumberger, Mallet in France. As growth ground to a halt due to the economic downturn in the early 1970s and the consolidation drive in the banking industry continued, Bank Mees & Hope decided to join forces with a robust partner. It found its match in Algemene Bank Nederland (ABN). Although Bank Mees & Hope became a wholly owned ABN subsidiary on 28 October 1975, it continued to operate under its own name until the merger with Pierson, Heldring & Pierson in 1993.

19th century – Pierson & Co. and Heldring & Pierson

The Pierson in MeesPierson stems from another direct predecessor of MeesPierson alongside Bank Mees & Hope: Pierson, Heldring & Pierson. This bank, too, was the product of a merger between even older banks and name givers.

Pierson, Heldring & Pierson’s areas of expertise had many overlaps with those of Bank Mees & Hope. Pierson, Heldring & Pierson mainly focused on the corporate sector, institutional investors and high-net-worth individuals.

In 1975, Pierson, Heldring & Pierson decided to join a general bank with a broader financial base, i.e. Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank (Amro). The firm, which had become a public limited company by that time, did stay fully independent under its new owner and continued to operate under its own name.

A forward-looking perspective

The fact that our bank has been around for 300 years is testament to its penchant for moving with the trends of the times, acting ahead of the market and plotting a visionary strategy that makes the difference. In short, it’s indicative of a forward-looking perspective. Our aim is to be there for our clients and support them with our expertise. We’re knowledgeable and socially engaged, we take a personalised approach and we have the qualities and mentality of a game changer. We’re in it for the long haul: we can’t wait for the next 300 years.

Trees for all

Creating a greener world

We’re as committed as ever to investing in the future of the planet, especially in our anniversary year. That’s why we’ve formed a unique partnership with Trees for All, a foundation that plants trees for us, so that we can look forward to a more sustainable future. This is how it works: we make a donation to Trees for All for each Video Banking meeting we have with a client. So far, as many as 2,000 trees have been planted with our help.

After having received the donation, Trees for All makes sure that the money is redirected to the following projects.

Voedselbos

Janmiekeshoeve agroforest

This agroforest measures two square hectares of about 2,400 trees and shrubs at the former dairy farm of the Heesakkers family. The plan is to convert some 18.5 hectares into an agroforest with landscape elements (bushes, hedges, natural ponds and flower-rich fields). This is meant to form an ecological link between the adjacent forested areas in the nature network.

Costa Rica

1,000 Trees in NL and 1,000 in Costa Rica

The Carara National Park in Costa Rica is one of the nature reserves with the highest biodiversity in Central America. Many plant and animal species have become extinct due to large-scale deforestation. Trees for All will be planting trees in the park over the next few years to help restore the primary forest. At this time, 65 hectares of forest have already been restored and a number of animal species have returned, including macaws, jaguars and capuchin monkeys.